9th Annual Farm Tour

Farm Tour 2016

Farm Tour 2016

Billed as a great family weekend, the Ninth Annual Farm Tour includes visits to more than twenty farms. Happening next weekend, October 22 and 23, 2016, visitors will learn about local farms, resource organizations, small gardeners and related vendors. There are farms near you in Leon County, Gadsden County, Jefferson County, Madison or Taylor County and farther west.

Jefferson County has a surprising lot of farms on this tour. Those farms will be open and welcoming you. I know of a farm where they specialize in Tennessee Fainting Goats, (be sure to see the great dogs who protect them). You will find farms that raise large varieties of vegetables, others that specialize in just a few or even in different kinds of fruit. There’s another near Monticello that raises bees and sells honey. You will find 20 farms in all, probably more than you can visit in a weekend.

Some of these most interesting places have mazes and other entertainment for your children and grandchildren, special entertainment besides the expected animals, chicken, turkeys and equipment they will be interested in seeing. Oh – there’s even a farm near Monticello where they grind Sugar Cane another that makes Mayhaw jelly.

 

Booklets with a map and complete information are available in many places in Monticello, Tallahassee, Greenville, Havana and other towns—even Bonifay and Eridu.

Remember, this is a self-guided tour. Each farm on the map gives you its own contact information. Don’t bring your pets, farm animals just don’t appreciate them as much as you do. Enjoy your weekend.

Lists of Farms to Visit

Monticello’s Harvest Dinner in a Rain Storm

Dessert Table - Harvest Dinner

Friends at Dinner

                         All seats were sold out, of course.  

All the best people were there — ready for a great Saturday evening at the Harvest Dinner by the Jefferson County Historical Association. Tables  placed around the Wirick-Simmons Garden in Monticello were all full. Guests ate venison, quail, sweet potatoes, deviled eggs and more. 

Barbara presided over yummy looking cakes, from pecan to double chocolate.

Then it sprinkled a little rain.

Everyone laughed a little and continued eating and talking to their friends around the large round tables.

Then it started to rain seriously. It began to pour. The wind blew and it rained — Oh my, how it rained.

As one, members of the group grabbed their plates and rushed under the large serving tent. Instead of six people at a table they crowded in twelve or maybe more – still enjoying their food.

Others stood along the serving tables. Some held their fine china plate in one hand and their real silver fork in the other. No matter the little rain problem, the food was delicious even interesting—and the company was better.

Some might want to say the Jefferson County Historical Association’s Harvest Dinner was rained out this year. They might want to say the event was a wash out, but that’s not what happened. We had a fabulous time and will never forget the wonderful Harvest Dinner when it rained buckets for hours. The dinner where we crowded in the serving tent, enjoyed our meal, our dessert. Some even finished with a cup of coffee, and we talked.

Yes, we talked. Groups formed and re-formed we reached out to everyone. Newcomers met life-long residents. We had time—time to find out what our old and new friends were doing and how things changed in their lives. We will certainly never forget this Harvest Dinner. When it was over, we realized — we didn’t mind a little rain at all.

Friends Eating and Laughing

Friends Eating and Laughing

Laughter is the best medicine.

Laughter is the best medicine.