Christmas Tour of Homes in Monticello, FL, 2016

Pearl Street in Monticello

CHRISTMAS TOUR OF HOMES in MONTICELLO, FLORIDA

Pearl Street in Monticello

Pearl Street in Monticello Florida

The 2016 Christmas Tour of Homes in the City of Monticello in Jefferson County Florida is on Saturday, December 10, 2016 from 12:00 to 6:00 PM. This event includes a self-directed tour of nine (9) historic venues and is presented by the Monticello Area Historic Preservation Association.

The tour costs $15.00 and you can buy tickets in advance from Monticello/Jefferson Chamber and several other venues in the town of Monticello and Southern Friends Framing and Antiques in Thomasville.

The most fun however, will be to go to the Women’s Club building at 985 East Pearl Street (Monticello’s prettiest street). They not only have tickets for the tour, they have their famous holiday cakes and if you are hungry they also offer a light meal for sale. The sponsors of this event provide a phone number if you have questions – 850-997-6552.

This tour encompasses an area of Monticello that is often overlooked except by local residents. You will see several houses that are truly beautiful as well as interesting historically and culturally.

One other thing you should look for during the tour is the magnificent Monticello Avenue of Oaks. These wonderful trees are worth the tour alone. Ask someone to direct you when you visit the Women’s Club.

The tour sponsor, Monticello Area Historic Preservation Association, works with our Women’s Club, Monticello/Jefferson Chamber, Jefferson County Tourist Development Council and Main Street of Monticello to encourage the preservation of the treasured buildings in this tiny 1827 town.

Monticello’s tree lined streets are full of small and large historic homes, many dating from before the Civil War. They are an expression of the best of our culture and we welcome your visit.

JC #1 347

JC #1 248

Located - Pearl and Jefferson

Located – Pearl and Jefferson

Monticello Christmas

Carolers by Anne Holt

by Anne Haw Holt

SONY DSC

A Story for Santa – Anne Holt

Christmas starts this Friday evening — that’s December 2! Monticello Downtown Christmas is always the first to celebrate this beautiful season. Starting around 5:00 or 5:30 PM the streets just north of the festively decorated Courthouse will be full of families hurrying to the garden at the Wirick-Simmons House to see the lighting of the community Christmas tree and hear the choirs singing old fashioned carols.

Carolers by Anne Holt

Shoppers will be visiting the interesting displays of gifts in our town’s unusual collection of specialty shops. Children will be watching for Santa to arrive on a fire truck.
East Dogwood Street will be full of colorful booths offering everything from the Monticello Women’s Club’s fabulous “Old Fashioned Christmas Fruitcake” to handmade jewelry, books and unusual gifts.
Carolers will stroll by. You may even hear someone reading “T’was the Night Before Christmas.” Children will sit in Santa’s lap as parents take their picture. Many will pose to take a family photo in front of the Community Christmas tree—ask someone to help, you’ll make them happy.
A little later, right in front of the public library on Water Street (two blocks south of Washington St. or Rt. 90) our beautiful live nativity scene, “Bethlehem in Monticello” will open. Children will marvel when they men, women and child actors with live animals bring the real Christmas story to life.

Bethlehem in Monticello Photographs by John Hicks

Bethlehem in Monticello - photo by John Hicks

beth-manger-3a

 

9th Annual Farm Tour

Farm Tour 2016

Farm Tour 2016

Billed as a great family weekend, the Ninth Annual Farm Tour includes visits to more than twenty farms. Happening next weekend, October 22 and 23, 2016, visitors will learn about local farms, resource organizations, small gardeners and related vendors. There are farms near you in Leon County, Gadsden County, Jefferson County, Madison or Taylor County and farther west.

Jefferson County has a surprising lot of farms on this tour. Those farms will be open and welcoming you. I know of a farm where they specialize in Tennessee Fainting Goats, (be sure to see the great dogs who protect them). You will find farms that raise large varieties of vegetables, others that specialize in just a few or even in different kinds of fruit. There’s another near Monticello that raises bees and sells honey. You will find 20 farms in all, probably more than you can visit in a weekend.

Some of these most interesting places have mazes and other entertainment for your children and grandchildren, special entertainment besides the expected animals, chicken, turkeys and equipment they will be interested in seeing. Oh – there’s even a farm near Monticello where they grind Sugar Cane another that makes Mayhaw jelly.

 

Booklets with a map and complete information are available in many places in Monticello, Tallahassee, Greenville, Havana and other towns—even Bonifay and Eridu.

Remember, this is a self-guided tour. Each farm on the map gives you its own contact information. Don’t bring your pets, farm animals just don’t appreciate them as much as you do. Enjoy your weekend.

Lists of Farms to Visit

Monticello’s Harvest Dinner in a Rain Storm

Dessert Table - Harvest Dinner

Friends at Dinner

                         All seats were sold out, of course.  

All the best people were there — ready for a great Saturday evening at the Harvest Dinner by the Jefferson County Historical Association. Tables  placed around the Wirick-Simmons Garden in Monticello were all full. Guests ate venison, quail, sweet potatoes, deviled eggs and more. 

Barbara presided over yummy looking cakes, from pecan to double chocolate.

Then it sprinkled a little rain.

Everyone laughed a little and continued eating and talking to their friends around the large round tables.

Then it started to rain seriously. It began to pour. The wind blew and it rained — Oh my, how it rained.

As one, members of the group grabbed their plates and rushed under the large serving tent. Instead of six people at a table they crowded in twelve or maybe more – still enjoying their food.

Others stood along the serving tables. Some held their fine china plate in one hand and their real silver fork in the other. No matter the little rain problem, the food was delicious even interesting—and the company was better.

Some might want to say the Jefferson County Historical Association’s Harvest Dinner was rained out this year. They might want to say the event was a wash out, but that’s not what happened. We had a fabulous time and will never forget the wonderful Harvest Dinner when it rained buckets for hours. The dinner where we crowded in the serving tent, enjoyed our meal, our dessert. Some even finished with a cup of coffee, and we talked.

Yes, we talked. Groups formed and re-formed we reached out to everyone. Newcomers met life-long residents. We had time—time to find out what our old and new friends were doing and how things changed in their lives. We will certainly never forget this Harvest Dinner. When it was over, we realized — we didn’t mind a little rain at all.

Friends Eating and Laughing

Friends Eating and Laughing

Laughter is the best medicine.

Laughter is the best medicine.

Joseph Neil Reed, Architect in Monticello, Jefferson County, Florida

Built in  frame in 1838, rebuilt in brick 1852, remodeled by J.Neel Reid in 1914

Hidden along the quiet streets of small towns in south Georgia and north Florida are forgotten treasures—unique and beautiful houses and buildings designed by the south’s great architect, Joseph Neel Reid. Atlanta and Macon Georgia boast many Reid buildings, but the tiny towns of Quitman, Georgia and Monticello, Florida have their own examples of Reid’s genius.

Built in  frame in 1838, rebuilt in brick 1852, remodeled by J.Neel Reid in 1914

Built in frame in 1838, rebuilt in brick 1852, remodeled by J.Neel Reid in 1914

Reid is described by author William R. Mitchell, Jr., as a “champion of architecture, gardens, and interior decoration, of fine arts and antiques, a leader of charm and style who helped to establish architecture and landscape architecture as professions in his region.”

A native of Alabama, Joseph Neel Reid began his career as an apprentice in Macon and Atlanta Georgia. He studied architecture at Columbia University in New York and the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His first partnership included Hal Hentz of Gadsden County, Florida and G. L. Norman. Adler joined the firm after the first year. Their earliest projects included homes in Colonial Revival style with Reid’s signature classical details and Italianate touches.

Reid redesigned and rebuilt the Jefferson Academy in Monticello Florida in 1914. Built first in the 1930s in frame, the school was redone in bricks handmade by slaves in 1852. In 1914, Reid added east and west wings and integrated them into the building’s new design with the sweep of wide steps and massive neo-classical columns across the front portico. Smaller columns cross the ground level entrance at the back of the building.

Known by many residents as the old Monticello High School, this building sits high above the south side of Washington Street near Monticello’s town center. On a corner, the location offers a clear view of this perfect example of Reid’s eclecticism, a graceful mixture of Greek-Revival and neo-Georgian.

The Turnbull House was designed by Joseph Neel Reid 1918

The Turnbull House was designed by Joseph Neel Reid 1918

A few blocks down Washington Street from the old Monticello High School building is Reid’s T. T. Turnbull house with its long Italianate loggia. This home was built for a representative to Florida’s legislature who later became a representative to the United States Congress. Complete Hentz and Reid drawings for both of these buildings are housed in the Georgia Tech archives in Atlanta.

Rear View of remodeled Old Monticello High School

Rear View of remodeled Old Monticello High School

 

 

The Wonder of Small Town Shopping

I Found It campaign logo - on or T shirts, and decals for merchants to place on bags and packages
I Found It campaign logo - on or T shirts, and decals for merchants to place on bags and packages

I Found It campaign logo – on Main Street T-shirts, and decals for merchants to place on bags and packages

It is amazing sometimes, what you can find to buy in a small town. Monticello has some particularly interesting examples. Take, for instance a store called “The Naked Ewe.” Well now. What do you think that means?

It is actually a yarn and related gift shop. I’m not kidding. They have yarn and thread, all you need for knitting or crocheting, and many handmade gifts. You can buy a handmade sweater, bonnet and bootees for a baby gift for a reasonable price. They even have handmade adult clothing.

The Naked Ewe is over on Cherry Street, just one block off North Jefferson (Route 19 just north of the courthouse round-about) near Dogwood Street. It sits right beside Mattco – our dance and exercise studio – peep in the window if you’re interested.

We also have a fascinating place called Huckleberry’s. That store is over on West Washington Street (Route 90, one block west of the courthouse) right beside Tupelo’s. Never heard of it? Imagine finding antiques, re-furbished and re-purposed furniture and gorgeous flowers right on the corner at Mulberry Street—the flower garden beside the store is lovely and changes all the time..

West Washington St. in Monticello FL in front of Huckleberry's.

West Washington St. in Monticello FL in front of Huckleberry’s.

If you never visited Tupelo’s you are in for a treat. They are open Tuesday through Saturday for breakfast and lunch with an occasional evening celebration with music. They serve real food beautifully prepared—they call it “slow food” because they use real organic ingredients. I am addicted to one or two of their specialties including a cinnamon roll that is beyond delicious.

That’s not all – you want interesting shopping? – Tupelo’s sells local goodies such as honey, jams and similar items, even art. They also sell bee-keeping supplies–that’s right–they have a whole room of those things.

That is only a few of the interesting shops to find in Monticello, Florida. We even have a couple of new ones in the works. Every time I check on their progress they tell me SOON. I’ll tell you about it.

Monticello’s Ecological Park

Monticello Ecological Park Committee meeting on the bridge

Monticello Ecological Park Committee meeting on the bridge

 

Located on south Water Street, at the top of the hill beyond the old school buildings, our city council purchased 26+ acres of old growth forest to give Monticello our own “urban forest.” Volunteers removed truck-loads of trash from the acreage, scoured it for invasive species and removed many—helped design trails and picnic grounds. The city found grant funding for building walks and bridges to provide access to the entire park and protect its wetlands.

Young Hawk

Young Hawk

If you haven’t visited yet, take your children or grandchildren with you, bring your Home School group. The Ecological park a great experience. You will hear or see more than 30 species of birds including turkeys, warblers, and owls. Bird watchers have certified sightings of every ordinary bird you can imagine and a few surprise visitors. Main Street and the Chamber are working to help the City get the park on the Great Florida Birding Trail. Birding groups from Tallahassee and the surrounding area are already visiting.

This child found butterflies and other interesting thing on the park trail

This child found butterflies on the park trail

A Monticello Ecological Park visit is a learning experience even for many adults but it is especially so for children. You will find signs naming trees and shrubs and signs explaining why we were so careful to protect the wetlands that actually help provide the clean, sweet water we drink right here in Monticello. I was fascinated to learn that the contractor who built the walks and bridges pushed the construction ahead of his tractor, never running a wheel into the wetlands.

There is fun in the park, not just education and exercise. You could host a luncheon on the bridge—turn left as you enter the park to find it. I attended a “brown bag” lunch hosted by Katrina and the Chamber. She placed folding tables and chairs on the bridge and we ate and discussed Monticello’s needs and our future for more than an hour.

The Park’s picnic area is used by the Boy Scouts on a regular basis, but it is open to you and any citizen. This area is to your left as you enter the park. The cleared picnic area boasts tables with benches and other things for your enjoyment. Extra parking is provided by our friends at the American Legion Post.

Go straight at the entrance and look to the left for the picnic area.

Go straight at the Park entrance and look to the left for the picnic area.